Advertisements


 

Monday
May162011

Tips from the Pros - May 2011

Training to be a Pro

By Vesna Ajic

Vesna AjicMuch is said about improving the skills of general aviation pilots, but what about those pilots who plan to make a career out of aviation?  How can men and women who dream of turning their passion for flight into a life long career improve their skills in a way that is meaningful to potential employers?

While a number of paths to an aviation profession are available, a company named Arizona Type Ratings (ATR) opens the road to jet experience that was once thought to be unaffordable without somehow getting a regional airline or corporation to help by underwriting the cost.  Many aspiring professional pilots do not realize that the authorization (FAA certificate) to act as a crewmember aboard a turbojet airplane that requires two pilots can be obtained in as little as one weekend.  Referred to as a Second in Command (SIC) Type Rating, ATR combines interactive training with a maximum flying time to make sure that trainees receive “in seat” practical experience that applies to flying a real airplane.  In the case of ATR, the Cessna Citation CE 500 and CE 525 are used, two of the most popular light jets flying today.  A full Type rating permits the trainee to act as pilot in command and, therefore, requires more training than the SIC.  Most Type rating applicants obtain not only their Type rating, but also the Airline Transport Pilot certificate.  Full Type and ATP training can take up to five days.

Advanced jet training is not limited to only those aspiring to a professional career.  More and more, the industry is seeing private jet owners who might have formerly utilized contract pilots wanting to do the flying themselves.  Companies like ATR are now going out of their way to break away from the “one jet serves all” type of training and making arrangements to train in the customer’s airplane, at the customer’s home base.  Many owners of business jets are pilots, but have considered the task of becoming qualified in their own airplane to be just a bit daunting.  When coupled with a custom training program conducted at their home base, one time bosses can now place themselves on the flying schedule.  Many add the multi engine rating to their certificate along with the Type rating.

Whether the reader is a “fly for fun” aviator, aspiring professional or business jet owner, training options are now available that are affordable and fun, with the resulting pilot skilled and safe.  Give it some thought.

Vesna Ajic

Vesna Ajic used to work as a lawyer in Yugoslavia. Relocating to the United States, she was introduced to aviation. After earning her pilot certificates, she began flying copilot on the Citation SII in 2004. She received her type ratings in both the 500 and 525 in 2007. Normally, a contract pilot in the Citation 550, Vesna primarily teaches ground school for Arizona Type Rating.

Wednesday
Apr132011

Tips from the Pros - April 2011

Emergency Maneuver and Unusual Attitude Training, WHY?

By Judy Phelps, Master CFI-A

CFII
 Vice President,
CP Aviation, Inc.

“2011 National CFI of the Year”

Judy Phelps of CP AviatioEmergency Maneuver and Unusual Attitude Training is a must for all pilots.  As a new pilot it was this very training that took the fear out of flying and gave me a new sense of comfort that I hadn’t experienced before in an airplane.

I absolutely hated stalls and was terrified of the thought of doing one by myself.  Could this be you?  If so, you need to learn about and explore the unknown.  Even if you have no fear, every pilot can benefit from experiencing spin entries and recoveries.  Equally important is being turned upside down in an airplane and recovering from the unusual attitude.

Although Emergency Maneuver and aerobatic training go together, a majority of the pilots I train come with the same purpose and that is to gain confidence.  Many however become hooked with their new found freedom and continue with basic aerobatics.

You may be wondering what kinds of things to expect while taking an Emergency Maneuver Training course.  To start with you will probably be flying an airplane that you have never flown before such as a Citabria or Decathlon, both excellent trainers.  During the first lesson you should be getting comfortable with the airplane by doing turns, slow flight and stalls.  This may sound basic but is necessary anytime you fly a new airplane.  Next comes the meat of the course, entry and recovery from one and two turn spins, aggravated spins, skidded turns, spirals, rolls, inverted flight, simulated wake turbulence, over banked conditions, recovery from unusual attitudes, simulated control loss and more.  By the time you have completed the training, not only will you be able to recover from unusual attitudes, but more importantly you will be able to recognize a bad situation and fix it before it becomes worse.

There are several schools and flight instructors throughout the country that provide Emergency Maneuver and Unusual Attitude Training.  A listing can be found by visiting the IAC (International Aerobatic Club) website WWW.IAC.org.  Once there click on “How to begin” and then select “Aerobatic schools.”  It is important that you receive this training in the proper aircraft with a qualified instructor.  The IAC website also has a link to a scholarship for Emergency Maneuver Training that I award in Oshkosh at Air Venture each year.

The next time your flight review rolls around consider taking an Emergency Maneuver Training Course.  This is a great way to improve your flying skills!

Monday
Mar142011

Tips from the Pros - March 2011

Get Back Into Flying!

By Julie Boatman Filucci

Manager, Cessna Pilot Centers

The air feels warmer, I swear. You may already hear birds on your morning walk. Spring comes into full swing in March and April, and that same verve that impels you to shed your coat may also compel you to look to the sky.

Has it been a few months since you’ve been flying? By the way, that’s completely normal. Life catches up with us, and frankly the prospect of preflighting in the cold is no one’s idea of a great time.

If you already have a place from which you rent an airplane, great—or maybe you have your own airplane. You’ve made the first step. But maybe there’s still some hesitation that keeps you from picking up the phone or going online to schedule. If you’re like me, you have to dig deep in the creases of your memory to recall your username and password to get to the online scheduler, or maybe you wonder about what airplanes are still available. A quick call to your flight school will clear things up in a hurry. Don’t be embarrassed…we have to remember so many processes these days and they all fade together, if you ask me.

So you have an appointment on the schedule. Now it’s time for a chart review. Pull up the latest charts online from any one of many providers (aopa.org is one) and review the airport layout, frequencies, and any “hot spots,” if your home airport has a history of runway incursions.

Do you need an instructor? When in doubt, say “yes!” This is your opportunity to practice anything you’re not comfortable doing on your own. In fact, if you come up with a few maneuvers that cause you to pause, that’s another clue you need an instructor.

Next on tap, get yourself current. On the ground, take a few extra minutes with your preflight. Slow yourself down. It’s exciting to get back into the air, but don’t rush. In the air, wake up the connection between your eyes and hands and feet with coordination exercises, and do some slow flight to regain your sense of the airplane at approach airspeed. Of course, a trio of landings is a minimum for the purposes of staying current, but you might also bring along a safety pilot and do an instrument approach or two if you’re rated.

So that’s it, right? Well, what if your gap has been years instead of months?

Get ready. Get current. Go fly! It’s the same process, just with a little more time devoted to each step.

You may have moved, or your former flight school is no longer an option. What do you look for in a school, in an instructor? Number one: A good flight school or instructor focuses on you. The reception should be friendly, and quickly get into assessing your needs. You should be put at ease, both by the staff’s professionalism and the overall impression of the school. Following an initial interview, the instructor should show up completely prepared at your next appointment, with a lesson plan that will assess your skills.

Two other important steps in the “get ready” process: Do you need a medical certificate and do you know the current regulations and airspace? If you haven’t flown since 9/11, things have changed. It’s not that hard—just a little different, and your instructor will guide you through the changes. But you’ll feel more confident if you show up with some background. You can review regs online through AOPA (aopa.org) or EAA (eaa.org), for example.

Once you’re ready, you’ll follow your instructor’s plan to get you current. This may take a few hours, perhaps up to ten hours if the rust is thick, so set your expectations appropriately.

Current? Now for the fun part: Go fly! Make flying an integral part of your life. Set an appointment like you would any regular exercise. Lapsed pilots can get back in the game—and we look forward to seeing you up there!



Monday
Mar142011

Tips from the Pros - March 2011

Get Back Into Flying!

By Julie Boatman Filucci

Manager, Cessna Pilot Centers

The air feels warmer, I swear. You may already hear birds on your morning walk. Spring comes into full swing in March and April, and that same verve that impels you to shed your coat may also compel you to look to the sky.

Has it been a few months since you’ve been flying? By the way, that’s completely normal. Life catches up with us, and frankly the prospect of preflighting in the cold is no one’s idea of a great time.

If you already have a place from which you rent an airplane, great—or maybe you have your own airplane. You’ve made the first step. But maybe there’s still some hesitation that keeps you from picking up the phone or going online to schedule. If you’re like me, you have to dig deep in the creases of your memory to recall your username and password to get to the online scheduler, or maybe you wonder about what airplanes are still available. A quick call to your flight school will clear things up in a hurry. Don’t be embarrassed…we have to remember so many processes these days and they all fade together, if you ask me.

So you have an appointment on the schedule. Now it’s time for a chart review. Pull up the latest charts online from any one of many providers (aopa.org is one) and review the airport layout, frequencies, and any “hot spots,” if your home airport has a history of runway incursions.

Do you need an instructor? When in doubt, say “yes!” This is your opportunity to practice anything you’re not comfortable doing on your own. In fact, if you come up with a few maneuvers that cause you to pause, that’s another clue you need an instructor.

Next on tap, get yourself current. On the ground, take a few extra minutes with your preflight. Slow yourself down. It’s exciting to get back into the air, but don’t rush. In the air, wake up the connection between your eyes and hands and feet with coordination exercises, and do some slow flight to regain your sense of the airplane at approach airspeed. Of course, a trio of landings is a minimum for the purposes of staying current, but you might also bring along a safety pilot and do an instrument approach or two if you’re rated.

So that’s it, right? Well, what if your gap has been years instead of months?

Get ready. Get current. Go fly! It’s the same process, just with a little more time devoted to each step.

You may have moved, or your former flight school is no longer an option. What do you look for in a school, in an instructor? Number one: A good flight school or instructor focuses on you. The reception should be friendly, and quickly get into assessing your needs. You should be put at ease, both by the staff’s professionalism and the overall impression of the school. Following an initial interview, the instructor should show up completely prepared at your next appointment, with a lesson plan that will assess your skills.

Two other important steps in the “get ready” process: Do you need a medical certificate and do you know the current regulations and airspace? If you haven’t flown since 9/11, things have changed. It’s not that hard—just a little different, and your instructor will guide you through the changes. But you’ll feel more confident if you show up with some background. You can review regs online through AOPA (aopa.org) or EAA (eaa.org), for example.

Once you’re ready, you’ll follow your instructor’s plan to get you current. This may take a few hours, perhaps up to ten hours if the rust is thick, so set your expectations appropriately.

Current? Now for the fun part: Go fly! Make flying an integral part of your life. Set an appointment like you would any regular exercise. Lapsed pilots can get back in the game—and we look forward to seeing you up there!



Tuesday
Feb082011

Tips from the Pros - February 2011

“Tips from the Pros” is a new feature dedicated to allowing the In Flight USA family of aviation professionals to share tips and information regarding flying skills, airframe care and engine operations.

Are you a pro? Send in your tips for consideration. Please send 400 to 600 words describing your tip to editor@inflightusa.com.

Reduce the Risk of Hypoxia

Do you or your passengers sometimes arrive after your flight feeling tired with a headache? Rest easy, you are not ill with some weird virus but more likely are suffering from the insidious effects of hypoxia.  Between 5,000 and 12,000 feet, hypoxia may cause the first signs of fatigue, drowsiness, sluggishness, headache, and slower reaction time. At 15,000 feet, the hypoxic effect becomes increasingly apparent in terms of impaired efficiency, increased drowsiness, errors in judgment, and difficulty with simple tasks requiring mental alertness or muscular coordination. These symptoms become more intensified with progressively higher ascent or with prolonged exposure

Hypoxia is a far more common problem than most helicopter pilots admit and is not limited to pilots of turbocharged or high performance aircraft.  Many pilots need and use oxygen below the 12,500 feet specified in the FARs. In general, it can be assumed that the normal, healthy individual is unlikely to need supplementary oxygen at altitudes below 8,000 feet. One exception is night flying. Because the retina of the eye is affected by even extremely mild hypoxia, deterioration of night vision becomes significant above 5,000 feet.

Flying three to four hours at seven to ten thousand feet is enough to cause hypoxia induced discomfort and possible disorientation to even the most healthy and physically fit pilot. Plus, on the average, women need supplemental oxygen about 2,000 feet lower than her male counterpart.

The sure fire way to reduce the risk of hypoxia caused discomfort is with a MH portable oxygen system.  A portable oxygen system can help you and your passengers arrive more comfortably.  With a portable system you also increase your airplanes utility as 12,500 feet of altitude may no longer be a barrier.  You’ll be able to climb over turbulence and weather, make use of favorable tailwinds and even enjoy the lighter traffic that flies between 10,000 and 20,000 feet.

MH Oxygen Systems has an easy to use two-person portable patented Pulse-Demand Oxygen System that reduces oxygen workload to almost nil.  The MH EDS O2D2 Pulse Demand automatically delivers the required supplemental oxygen for various altitudes for both the pilot and passengers.

The complete standard, ready-to-go, MH O2D2 Pulse Demand system consists of an aluminum oxygen cylinder (pilots have a choice of sizes with upgrades available for very lightweight composite cylinders), a cylinder carry case that attaches to the back of the seat, primary reducing regulator, low pressure service line, connection fittings, the O2D2 oxygen controller unit, breathing cannulas, face masks, and a tote bag.

A variety of options are available to meet specific pilot needs. Options include lightweight composite cylinders, regulators, adapters, cannulas, comfortable facemasks (sans plastic bag) with or without mics and built-in systems to name a few. 

For additional information, contact Mountain High Equipment & Supply toll free at 800-468-8185 or E-mail sales@MHoxygen.com.



Page 1 2
Copyright © 2009, In Flight Media. All rights reserved.
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License.
Creative Commons License

Designed by jbNadler Creative Labs