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Monday
Jan302012

User Fee’s: Paying Their Fair Share?

By Ed Downs

I doubt that many readers of this editorial are completely ignorant of the war being waged against business and general aviation.  Yes, we are talking about the “per flight” user fees that have been recommended by our pals in Washington, DC.  The Office of Management and Budget (OMB, essentially the White House’s accounting folks), have recommended that all turbine flights be charged a $100 per flight service fee for “ATC Services.”  Small, piston engine aircraft and aircraft operating in uncontrolled airspace are specifically excluded.  There are other odious details, but this writer will assume that our readers are already aware of this well publicized OMB recommendation and that you have already responded to the request by multiple aviation alphabet groups to participate in a petition appearing on the White House website, “We the People.” 

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Monday
Jan302012

The Dot Lemon Saga

Who was Dot Lemon?

For EAA.org by Richard Kinsman, EAA 1074330

(Reprinted with permission from EAA Vintage Airplane, Nov. 2011)

Dot Lemon (Courtesy of EAA)Mystery woman, barnstormer, pylon racer, gold-mine owner, Whitney family orphan … take your pick.

The history and mystery of this compelling woman (1907-1986) will be the subject of an exhibit at the International Women’s Air and Space Museum, from Oct. 3 to Jan. 3, 2012, in Cleveland, Ohio.

Dot Lemon never publicly identified her birth parents as members of the wealthy and prominent Chicago Whitney family, although the Whitney name appears on her birth certificate and passport application, signed by her. While she often alluded to the fact that she was the adopted daughter of the parents who raised her, Pastor and Mrs. Albert Martin, she maintained that her biological father was a wealthy and prominent man from Chicago. Her response to further inquiries on the matter was that her past was “private.” In spite of her obscure and controversial birth origins, she lived a colorful and amazingly successful life.

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Monday
Jan302012

From Skies to Stars

By Ed Downs

Member, Astronomy Club of Tulsa

Ed Downs with his Orion Dobsonian telescope.From Skies to Stars is a new feature appearing in In Flight USA for the first time.  In Flight USA is keeping our promise made in the August 2011 editorial regarding the downfall of America’s manned space program.  At that time we committed to keeping the flame of space exploration alive by bringing our readers regular information about astronomy, space exploration and space sciences.  We have joined up with the Tulsa Air and Space Museum & Planetarium (TASM) and the Astronomy Club of Tulsa (ACT), a dedicated group of professional and amateur astronomers, science enthusiast and professional educators who have generously offered to share their ongoing outreach program with our readers.  We invite readers to participate and let us know what you would like to read.  The staff at In Flight USA may be reached at editor@inflightusa.com.  Read on, and discover the universe!

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Monday
Jan302012

Early Adventures In My Luscombe 8A, Part Three

By Steve Weaver

Continued from the January 2012 Issue

By the time I reached Pennsboro the ground was totally dark and now I was following the lights of moving cars that I fervently hoped were moving toward Parkersburg. Worse, I had no lights on the airplane and nothing to light the instrument panel, which at this point was a just a dark shape in front of my knees. I had never been in an airplane at night before, and as the visual cues that I had used in flying, without even thinking about them, slipped away one by one, I felt like a man being swept by swift waters to a waiting waterfall. The brassy taste of fear was in my mouth. 

The speed of the little airplane over the ground now seemed reduced to a snail’s pace, and the indistinct gloaming below passed ever so slowly. The sky, still with faint afterglow on the western horizon, had darkened above me and stars were beginning to appear. I kept trying to comprehend the fact that I was flying an airplane alone, through a night sky.

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Monday
Jan302012

Debbie La Mere, Combat Soldier

Two Tours of Duty, Afghanistan

By Herb Foreman

Deborah manning one of the 7.62mm machine guns near the door of the Chinook. (Courtesy of Deborah Lamere)It was almost 10 years ago that I met Debbie and wrote an article for In Flight USA about her. She was a 27-year old computer wizard working for Corio in a new building at the south end of the runway at the San Carlos, California Airport. She could do computations using the computer that few people could comprehend.

The airport proved to be a magnet for Debbie. She joined the West Valley Flying Club on the field in 1998, and was soon immersed in aviation activities. By early 1999, she had her private license and began to work on her instrument ticket. Debbie was a quick learner and she loved to fly. She purchased a 1974 Cessna Cardinal – the year of her birth – and began to spend hours in the air. She learned how to change oil, clean spark plugs and assisted in the Cardinal’s annual inspection. She was a good pilot and had over 600 hours in her logbook.

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